Recognizing POWs, Remembering Those Still Missing

Source: wikimedia.org

Source: wikimedia.org

The following is an article written by Darlene Richardson, Historian, Department of Veterans Affairs:

This Friday, September 20, 2013, marks the 34th annual observance of National Prisoner of War and Missing in Action Recognition Day in America.

Since our country beginnings, hundreds of soldiers, sailors and Marines who left their homes to fight America’s wars were imprisoned and held against their will by our enemies, or they never returned home; their fates, as yet, unknown.

Roughly 16 million Americans served in World War II, and at the end of the war 79,000 were missing. Today, 73,000 from World War II remain missing and unaccounted for.

In the Vietnam War’s aftermath, over 2,500 Servicemembers were missing and their families pressed the government for action. While the military continued its efforts to locate and account for all of the missing, a joint resolution of Congress and a presidential proclamation by President Jimmy Carter called on the nation to remember those who had not returned home and pronounced July 18, 1979 as the first National POW/MIA Recognition Day in the U.S.

This special day of remembrance was established to “honor those Americans who have been prisoners of war and those listed as missing in action…and to rekindle the memory of the sacrifices these individuals have made for their country and our indebtedness to them.”

This annual commemorative day was originally held in April or July, until 1986, when it was observed on the third Friday in September for the first time. The designated day for the national recognition is determined each year by a joint resolution of Congress, followed by a Presidential proclamation and has been observed in late September since 1986.

Many VA medical centers will be holding special ceremonies this week to honor POW/MIA Americans. Find your local VA facility here.

Airmen From Vietnam War Identified

And just as MIA recognition day arrives, so does word that the Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO) that the remains of Air Force pilots Maj. James E. Sizemore of Lawrenceville, Ill., and Maj. Howard V. Andre Jr., of Memphis, Tenn., have been identified and will be returned to their families for burial with full military honors on Sept. 23 at Arlington National Cemetery.

The duo died when their aircraft crashed July 8, 1969 in Xiangkhoang Province, Laos but their remains were unaccounted for until April 2013. There are more than 1,640 American service members still unaccounted-for from the Vietnam War. More information is available at the http://www.dtic.mil/dpmo.

by Darlene Richardson, Historian, Department of Veterans Affairs
Thursday, September 19, 2013

This Friday, September 20, 2013, marks the 34th annual observance of National Prisoner of War and Missing in Action Recognition Day in America.

Since our country beginnings, hundreds of soldiers, sailors and Marines who left their homes to fight America’s wars were imprisoned and held against their will by our enemies, or they never returned home; their fates, as yet, unknown.

Roughly 16 million Americans served in World War II, and at the end of the war 79,000 were missing. Today, 73,000 from World War II remain missing and unaccounted for.

In the Vietnam War’s aftermath, over 2,500 Servicemembers were missing and their families pressed the government for action. While the military continued its efforts to locate and account for all of the missing, a joint resolution of Congress and a presidential proclamation by President Jimmy Carter called on the nation to remember those who had not returned home and pronounced July 18, 1979 as the first National POW/MIA Recognition Day in the U.S.

- See more at: http://www.va.gov/health/NewsFeatures/2013/September/Missing-but-Not-Forgotten.asp#sthash.IjYNP0Wk.dpuf

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4 Responses

  1. I’m glad to see someone else remembered today.

  2. Sitll missing but never forget. And also if there is not a body our prayers are elevated for them, a flower is posed on the place where they are died, if died, our thoughts come where they may be alive. They are, on any moment, alive and with us and our remember is charged of hope and serenity claudio alpaca

  3. […] Recognizing POWs, Remembering Those Still Missing (offthebase.wordpress.com) […]

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