Marine Lima 3/25 Company Memorial Exhibit Tours Florida

The artist's depiction of LCpl Timothy Bell, Jr, Sgt Justin Hoffman, and LCpl Nicholas Bloem from the Lima Company Memorial traveling exhibit.

The artist’s depiction of LCpl Timothy Bell, Jr, Sgt Justin Hoffman, and LCpl Nicholas Bloem from the Lima Company Memorial traveling exhibit.

Opening today, April 7, 2014, and staying for only three days in Tampa, Florida is an art exhibit that has become an iconic symbol for the men and women who served in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.

The Lima Company Memorial: The Eyes of Freedom exhibit features life-size paintings depicting 23 Marines from the small Ohio Reserves unit L 3/25 who were killed in action in 2005 in Iraq.

Mike Strahle served with Lima Company and now shepherds the exhibit around the U.S. He said the exhibit has a broader reach than just his generation.

“It is a great example of a traveling exhibit for this modern war on terror. I don’t even want to limit it to just this war,” Strahle said. “We have so many men and women that come in and see our exhibit from WWII, Korea, Vietnam (wars), and it’s just as moving for them as it is for the 25 to 35-year-olds that have fought in the current war on terror.”

The Lima Company Memorial was open for three days in Clearwater before moving to the Tampa USF Campus.

The USF Student Veterans Association is hosting the traveling exhibit which is set up at the Marshall Center. Marine Reservist Patrick Sweickart hopes the exhibit will bring closure to his fellow student veterans who deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan.

“There’s a ton of student veterans whether they were active duty going to school or Reservist or National Guard for Florida that while they were going to classes got called to order, called to serve, they had to leave in the middle of the semester and do a tour,” Sweickart said.

The Lima Company Memorial – Eyes of Freedom is free and open to the public.

The hours at USF’s Marshall Center – Ballroom C – are: Monday noon-8 pm, Tuesday 8 am-8 pm, and Wednesday 8am-4 pm.

The exhibit will then move on to Melbourne for a three-day stop before returning to Ohio.

Medal of Honor Marine Backs Gold Star Memorial

Hershel "Woody" Williams said he is only the caretaker of the Medal of Honor, hanging around his neck, that it belongs to those who lost their lives protecting him on the Iwo Jima battlefield.

Hershel “Woody” Williams said he is only the caretaker of the Medal of Honor, hanging around his neck, that it belongs to those who lost their lives protecting him on the Iwo Jima battlefield.

It took four hours, six flame-throwers and the lives of two fellow Marines, but Cpl. Hershel “Woody” Williams knocked out seven Japanese pillboxes on Iwo Jima February 23, 1945.

It was his fourth day on the Pacific island.

Williams said six members of his original special weapons unit had been killed and he was the sole survivor.

He recalled an officer calling him and others together in a shell crater. The officer asked for suggestions on how to knockout the machine gun fire coming from Japanese several fortified, concrete bunkers that had the Marines pinned down.

Williams volunteered to attack the “pillboxes” using a flamethrower.

For his conspicuous gallantry and risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty, Williams was awarded the Medal of Honor.

“This medal, I have claimed from the very beginning, it really doesn’t belong to me,” Williams said. “I wear it in their honor. I am just a caretaker of this medal because if it hadn’t been for those individuals willing to give their life, and the other individuals willing to protect me, I wouldn’t be here.”

Williams said during that four-hour battle, he was never touched. But two of the four Marines assigned to protect his solo assault on the pillboxes were killed doing so.

He shared those details with me and another reporter prior to his presentation at Tampa’s Franklin Boys Preparatory Academy. The students there have vowed to build a memorial to honor Gold Star families.

Williams has dedicated himself to building a Gold Star family memorial in each of the 50 states.

Hershel Williams cheers on students at the Franklin Boys Preparatory Academy as they applauded his $5,000 donation toward their effort to build a Gold Star Family Memorial.

Hershel Williams cheers on students at the Franklin Boys Preparatory Academy as they applauded his $5,000 donation toward their effort to build a Gold Star Family Memorial.

So, he visited the boy’s academy to lend the support of his foundation, Hershel “Woody” Williams Medal of Honor Foundation, and present them with a $5,000 check toward their $40,000 goal.

In turn, the Boys Preparatory Academy at Franklin Middle School presented the 90-year-old veteran with a special lanyard recognizing his service in WWII, his continued support of Gold Star families and his contribution to their effort to build a Gold Star Memorial.

Tears welled in the eyes of the battle-tested Marine who asked for a moment to compose himself before thanking the students, teachers and others in the auditorium. He wiped his tears away as he walked back to his seat on stage.

Shortly afterward, Williams joined several of the students, military representatives and school officials at a ceremonial ground breaking.

They plan to build the memorial in front of the historic brick Franklin Middle School, 3915 21st Ave., Tampa, FL.

 

The ceremonial groundbreaking for a Gold Star Family Memorial outside Franklin Boys Preparatory Academy, 3915 21st Ave., Tampa.

The ceremonial groundbreaking for a Gold Star Family Memorial outside Franklin Boys Preparatory Academy, 3915 21st Ave., Tampa.

 

 

Camp Lejeune Toxic Water May Link to Higher Cancer Deaths

Photo courtesy: The Few, The Proud, The Forgotten web site.

Photo courtesy: The Few, The Proud, The Forgotten web site.

  they shared news of a new study that found Marine and Navy personnel stationed at Camp Lejeune, N.C. who were exposed to decades of polluted drinking water are dying at a higher rate than military personnel at other bases, reports the Tampa Bay Times.

The federal Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry’s study backs up concerns that contaminated drinking water at Camp Lejeune may be tied to cancers and illness in as many as 1 million people..

The study found that personnel stationed at the base from 1975 to 1985 had death rates for all cancers 10 percent higher than at Camp Pendleton in California. It compared deaths of 8,964 people at Camp Lejuene between 1975 and 1985, and compared it with deaths of people at Camp Pendleton during the same time period.

Families affected by the tainted water were encouraged to apply for care through the Department of Veterans Affairs. Yet, many are frustrated by the VA red-tape and paperwork according to a report in the Sarasota Herald Tribune.

“The VA keeps asking for the same stuff over and over again, and when I send it to them they say they can’t find it,” “It’s pretty crazy,” Englewood’s Cheryl Baillargeon, whose first husband, Dan Albert, died of cancer 24 years ago, told the Sarasota Herald Tribune.

In 2012, President Obama signed a law that provided health care for people with medical problems linked to the toxic chemicals who lived or worked at the base from 1957 to 1987 reports the Tampa Bay Times.

Marine Commandant Calls for Reawakening of Core Values

Official portrait, uncovered, of the 35th Commandant of the Marine Corps, Gen. James F. Amos. Gen. Amos is the first aviator in Marine Corps history to be selected for the post, and the first assistant commandant to be promoted to the position in more than 20 years. (U.S.Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Alvin Williams/RELEASED)

The 35th Commandant of the Marine Corps, Gen. James F. Amos. (U.S.Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Alvin Williams/RELEASED)

General James Amos, commandant of the U.S. Marine Corps, greeted me front and center Monday morning. He was the prime-time interview on NPR’s Morning Edition.

The interview with NPR host Renee Montagne runs for almost nine minutes. The transcript is available, but it’s worth taking the time to listen as Montagne questions the general about his letter where the general called for help: … (to) reawaken the soul of our corps against an enemy emerging from within our ranks. Who or what is the enemy?

Gen. Amos’ response: First of all, the 98 percent of the Marine Corps is absolutely on what I call a moral compass heading of true north. We’re really talking about those 2 percent that are out there on the fringes of our institution, they wear our cloth, and they’re not living up to our standards. And it’s being manifested in a variety of different kinds of poor-choice behaviors. It can be hazing. It can be sexual assault. I mean, it can be abusive behavior, not only to Marines, but perhaps to yourself or your family. So that’s what we’re talking about.

You can read the full transcript and listen to the interview here.

Florida Student Veterans to Battle for In-State Tuition

Marine Corps veteran Kelly Matisi is a University of South Florida student who got hit with Florida's soaring out-of-state tuition rates.

Marine Corps veteran Kelly Matisi is a University of South Florida student who got hit with Florida’s soaring out-of-state tuition rates.

From Gov. Rick Scott to local lawmakers, elected officials love to brag that Florida is “the most veteran friendly state” in the nation.

Many student veterans believe it’s time the politicians prove it and give out-of-state student veterans tuition waivers so they can pay significantly cheaper, in-state tuition rates while attending Florida universities, colleges and trade schools.

More than a dozen other states give all student veterans in-state tuition rates regardless of their state of origin.

“In Texas, all veterans get in-state tuition so I guess it was something I never really thought about,” said Kelly Matisi, a 9-year Marine Corps veteran who transferred to the University of South Florida with the goal of getting into the physical therapy doctoral program.

A veteran of both the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, Matisi was surprised to find that Florida did not offer student veterans in-state tuition rates. And it hit her pocketbook hard. Her tuition soared from $1,300 a semester to more than $8,500 when she transferred from a Texas university.

Matisi is not alone. A legislative analysis shows that more than 500 undergraduate and graduate student veterans paid out-of-state tuition rates totaling more than $8 million to Florida universities. Florida community colleges received more than $1 million from out-of-state student veterans.

Kelly Matisi, a 9-year veteran of the Marine Corps, in Iraq.

Kelly Matisi, a 9-year veteran of the Marine Corps, in Iraq.

“I work in the Office of Veteran Services. We’ve gotten calls from veterans asking that very question: ‘Do you guys give in-state tuition to veterans?’ And I have to tell them no.” Matisi said.

She said without the waiver it’s almost like Florida is turning its back on those who have served.

“We didn’t serve the State of Florida. We didn’t serve the State of Texas. We served the United States,” Matisi said. “So, we kind of feel like picking and choosing who gets a certain amount of tuition and who doesn’t based on where you enlisted, it doesn’t make a whole lot of sense.”

One thing the student veterans have going for them is their training. They come from a culture that never says quit. That’s the attitude Ray Mollison, president of the USF Student Veterans Association, adopted when the in-state tuition bill died in a senate committee last session.

“We do have a huge veteran population,” Mollison said last summer. “So, it’s going to bring a big voice next time when this bill does go up there again. And I think there’s going to be a lot more pull and a lot more active people trying to make this happen because the State of Florida has a lot of veterans.”

Marine Corps Staff Sergeant Kelly Matisi (center) with her brother and mother.

Marine Corps Staff Sergeant Kelly Matisi (center) with her brother and mother.

And student veterans’ “big voice” is already being heard. House Speaker Will Weatherford was already predicting passage of the tuition waiver for out-of-state student veterans.

“I think it’s important that we give our veterans the opportunity to go back to school to get the education that they need in the 21st century to make sure they can find employment. These are men and women who have served our country admirably across the country and across the world. And we owe that to them and I feel very confident that we’ll get a bill done like that this year,” Weatherford said in December.

But just in case, Matisia plans to join other student veterans for a trip to Tallahassee in February to lobby lawmakers for passage of (Senate Bill)SB 84 or the House version, (Proposed Committee Bill)PCB 14-01.

You can listen to the radio version of this story at WUSF News.

8 Things to Know About the Afghanistan Withdrawl

After 31 years as a Marine Corps officer, Scott Anderson took a civilian job. He now serves as director of Logistics and Engineering for U.S. Central Command.

After 31 years as a Marine Corps officer, Scott Anderson took a civilian job. He now serves as director of Logistics and Engineering for U.S. Central Command.

It’s a delicate balance keeping troops supplied while downsizing in Afghanistan. Then, add the mandate to do it in the most economical and efficient way.

That’s why troops in Afghanistan, including the commander Marine Gen. Joseph Dunford, are eating an MRE for one of their three daily meals. There are a lot of prepackaged Meals Ready to Eat stored in Afghanistan and they are not worth the cost to ship home.

Despite the uncertainty over how many U.S. troops will remain in Afghanistan at the end of 2014, logistics experts at U.S. Central Command are already closing bases and moving out equipment and troops.

Retired Marine officer Scott Anderson is the civilian in charge of logistics and engineering for CENTCOM.

The time differential between Afghanistan and Tampa, FL is 9.5 hours during Daily Savings Time. That means Anderson comes to work very early in the morning, more like late at night, to coordinate with his military counterparts in theater.

A digital board displaying several time zones is mounted above a large flat-screen TV in his office at U.S. Central Command on MacDill Air Force Base.

And the clock is ticking for Anderson and his logistician counterparts from the Pentagon to the Pakistan’s Port of Karachi. They have just over a year to ship, transfer or destroy tons of equipment originally sent to Afghanistan to support troops.

Here are some details Anderson shared on their progress:

  • They are 60 percent complete with base closures in Afghanistan.
  • At the peak, there were 360 bases in Afghanistan, now; there are fewer than 44 bases.
  • Afghan Security Forces identified the bases they wanted and asked the U.S. to build some new ones.
  • U.S. engineers are training Afghans on base operations like the electrical grid and water systems.
  • A snapshot of how much equipment is coming home: for the period of Sept. 10, 2013 to Jan. 31, 2014, 7500 vehicles and about 1500 shipping containers will be moved out.
  • Troops are eating a prepackaged MRE (Meal Ready to Eat) for one of their three daily meals to use up stores that are too expensive to ship home.
  • The cheapest way to ship equipment out of Afghanistan is to truck it to the Port of Karachi in Pakistan and sail it home. Currently, 70 percent is coming out that way.
  • There are two options for equipment too old or too expensive to ship home: transfer it to the Afghan Security Forces or destroy it if it is deemed it the equipment would only be a burden to the Afghans.

Anderson said his biggest challenge is to not draw-down too quickly. He does not want a scenario where a soldier doesn’t have a meal or enough fuel in his vehicle.

Marine Who Won VA Coverage for Camp LeJeune Water Dies

Photo courtesy: The Few, The Proud, The Forgotten web site.

Photo courtesy: The Few, The Proud, The Forgotten web site.

A Marine who challenged and finally won his VA disability claim that his breast cancer was linked to Camp Lejeune contaminated water died just months after winning his claim according to the Sarasota Herald-Tribune.

Tom Gervasi, a veteran who won his protracted disability claim fight with the government over the rare cancer he contracted during his service, died Tuesday at home in Sarasota.

He was 77.

While serving in the Marines at Camp Lejeune, N.C., in 1956, Gervasi was exposed to contaminated water that caused breast cancer, which rarely affects men. For the last decade, he fought with the government over medical coverage for him and other veterans.

After repeated denials, he finally received a letter from the Department of Veterans Affairs in April confirming that the contaminated water had in fact caused his cancer.

Read the full Sarasota Herald-Tribune article here.

In March, the VA started reaching out to former Marines and families who lived at Lejeune during the period of contamination. Details on eligibility and a list of illnesses covered by the VA such as breast cancer, bladder cancer and female infertility are available here.

If you served at Camp Lejeune during the period of contamination, August 1953 through 1987, and have health problems, you may be eligible for VA benefits. Details are available here.

Researchers Work to Prevent Neglect Felt by Past Veterans

U.S. Marines Cpl. Ryan L. Avery, left, a crew chief and Lance Cpl. Michael J. McGrath, a CH-53E Super Stallion mechanic, both with Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 462 (HMH-462), provide aerial security over Helmand province, Afghanistan, Oct. 28, 2013. HMH-462 supported Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 9th Marine Regiment, during an interdiction operation in Gurjat Village. (Official Marine Corps Photo by Sgt. Gabriela Garcia

U.S. Marines Cpl. Ryan L. Avery, left, a crew chief and Lance Cpl. Michael J. McGrath, a CH-53E Super Stallion mechanic, both with Marine Heavy Helicopter Squadron 462 (HMH-462), provide aerial security over Helmand province, Afghanistan, Oct. 28, 2013. HMH-462 supported Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 9th Marine Regiment, during an interdiction operation in Gurjat Village. Official Marine Corps Photo by Sgt. Gabriela Garcia

An estimated 2.3 million men and women have served during the nation’s 12 years of war. And as they transition out of the military, the veterans will need care for immediate and long-term conditions like post-traumatic stress and traumatic brain injury.

And many from health care professionals to retired military are concerned that the neglect of past veterans is not repeated with this new generation.

Troops in WWII came home in 1945 and went right back to work and college. There was no re-integration, no recognition of post-traumatic stress. So many WWII vets had to find their own ways to cope with the trauma of war.

“I never saw my father go to bed – in my entire life – sober. I never saw him go to work drunk,” said retired Lt. Gen. Martin Steele. “I always saw this tortured man with the self-discipline and commitment and resolve to live life one day at a time.”

SAN DIEGO (Oct. 29, 2013) Engineman 1st Class Kevin Ives, assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Princeton (CG 59), embraces his sons during a homecoming celebration at Naval Base San Diego. Princeton conducted maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Christopher Farrington

SAN DIEGO (Oct. 29, 2013) Engineman 1st Class Kevin Ives, assigned to the guided-missile cruiser USS Princeton (CG 59), embraces his sons during a homecoming celebration at Naval Base San Diego. Princeton conducted maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Christopher Farrington

Alcohol was how Steele’s step-father, a WWII veteran, dealt with his trauma of having his fighter plane shot down, spending a year in a Prisoner of War camp and being tortured by the Germans.

His step-father’s story of survival transfixed Steele who joined the Marines at age 18 and served two tours in Vietnam.

“Many of my generation in Vietnam struggle every day. They’re not coming out,” said Steele, who retired as a three-star Marine Corps general.

Yet only recently, did two of his closest buddies from Vietnam confided to him that they suffered from post-traumatic stress. Steel said they told him in the hope that current PTSD research could possibly help them.

Steele now serves as associate vice president for Veterans Research at USF – home to several veterans health initiatives for treatment of Military PTSD. One example is Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART). Dr. Kevin Kip, head of research for the College of Nursing, runs the ART program.

U.S. Army Pfc. Rohan Wright, center, a cavalry scout with a personal security detachment with the 4th Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, prepares to fire an M203 grenade launcher at the weapons range at Forward Operating Base Thunder in Paktia province, Afghanistan, Oct. 18, 2013. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Justin A. Moeller

U.S. Army Pfc. Rohan Wright, center, a cavalry scout with a personal security detachment with the 4th Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, prepares to fire an M203 grenade launcher at the weapons range at Forward Operating Base Thunder in Paktia province, Afghanistan, Oct. 18, 2013. U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Justin A. Moeller

“We do have a new study starting up for post-traumatic stress disorder many of whom the veterans will be treated at the C.W. Bill Young Building on campus,” Kip said.

The goal of academia is to apply the research as quickly as possible according to Interim Vice President of USF Health Dr. Donna Petersen.

“We simply can’t wait for the usual trickle down of our scientific papers and years later becoming accepted practice,” Petersen told a gathering at USF’s national conference on veterans health.

But research is just the first step in caring for the new generation of Afghanistan and Iraq war veterans.

“This population that we now have who have served in this 12 years of protracted war that we have to have a net for them,” Steele said. “Yes, they have to take care of themselves but we have to have a net for them to be able to welcome them with open arms and provide all the resources this nation can bring to bear to ensure that they have a quality of life.”

And Steele added that caring for today’s veterans will help mitigate the lack of services provided to veterans of WWII and his generation from the Vietnam War.

You can hear the radio version of this story at WUSF News.org.

Wounded Veterans Train to Combat Online Pedophiles

A photo of Justin Gaertner and his service dog Gunner during the HERO Corps training.

A photo of Justin Gaertner and his service dog Gunner during the HERO Corps training.

One retired Marine is using his battlefield training that helped him track terrorists in Afghanistan to find child predators back home.

Justin Gaertner joined the Marine Corps just days after graduating from J.W. Mitchell High School in New Port Richey. In five years, he did three tours, two of them in Afghanistan.

Justin Gaertner under fire from Taliban insurgents during his second deployment in Afghanistan. Photo courtesy of Justin Gaertner.

Justin Gaertner under fire from Taliban insurgents during his second deployment in Afghanistan. Photo courtesy of Justin Gaertner.

He was serving as a combat engineer, sweeping for improvised explosive devices (IEDs), when he was severely wounded.

“Honestly, I thought that life was over. When I got blown up in Afghanistan, I was like this is it I’m done,” Gaertner said. “I didn’t think I was going to live. I didn’t think I was going to walk again. I didn’t think I would ever do a tenth of the things I’ve done since I lost my legs.”

Justin lost both his legs and has other permanent injuries, but he has since become a world-class athlete with five gold medals in the National Veterans Wheelchair Games held this July in Tampa. And he recently cycled across America with a team of wounded veterans in 7 days, 12 hours and 21 minutes.

“The way it seems, I’ve done more things without my legs than I did with my legs,” Gaertner said. “I never thought that I would get the chance to walk again or get the chance to do something as great as being a part of the HERO Corps ever again.”

Justin Gaertner served as a combat engineer in Afghanistan where he searched for IEDs and the terrorists who made the improvised explosive devices.

Justin Gaertner served as a combat engineer in Afghanistan where he searched for IEDs and the terrorists who made the improvised explosive devices.

The HERO Corps is an acronym for the Human Exploitation Rescue Operative Corps. It is a pilot program that is training wounded veterans to track down online child sexual predators and pornographers.

Justin is one of 17 wounded veterans from Special Operations currently training at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. He’s learning computer forensic analysis and digital evidence collection to identify and rescue child victims of sexual abuse and online sexual exploitation.

“It’s just like being back in country. I mean, you’re using the same mindset to track one terrorist and moving to track a different terrorist because that’s how I view a pedophile or child pornographers,” Gaertner said.

The HERO Corps training is as rigorous as Gaertner’s Marine boot camp which required physical endurance, but this training requires mental toughness he said.

Justin Gaertner crossing the finish line - first in the 10K hand-cycling event during the 2013 National Veterans Wheelchair Games in Tampa.

Justin Gaertner crossing the finish line – first in the 10K hand-cycling event during the 2013 National Veterans Wheelchair Games in Tampa.

“It’s hard to mentally deal with what we’re dealing with here, because of the images and video that we’re viewing,” Gaertner said. “I mean what’s going on out there, the normal average American doesn’t realize how bad child exploitation is. The way I see it is I might be looking at this stuff everyday but the outcome of it is that I’m preserving our children’s future and the good thing about it is I can save a child’s life.”

A chance to save a life, to serve again, and to use his analytical skills developed on the battlefield drives Gaertner. He said that’s why the pilot HERO Corps targeted wounded warriors from  Special Operations Command and the Marines.

“The skills that we had on the battlefield we can put onto a new battlefield and that’s what it’s all about, getting back in the fight, Because everything I’ve learned about tracking down terrorists over in Afghanistan, I’m trying to use the same mindset here back on the home front,” Gaertner said.

Gaertner will return from his training in a few weeks to Tampa for a 9-month internship at the office of Homeland Security Investigations.

May We Never Forget – Tampa’s Run for the Fallen

 

The display of markers for each Floridian killed in the Afghanistan and Iraq Wars set up for the 2013 Run for the Fallen this coming Sunday.

The display of markers for each Floridian killed in the Afghanistan and Iraq Wars set up for the 2013 Run for the Fallen this coming Sunday.

The markers went up on Sunday – one for each of Florida’s Fallen from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. 

If the photos from the Marine Families Facebook page don’t move you, maybe the words of the organization’s president will. Here is Cyd Deathe’s heartfelt posting:

Okay, it has been a very emotional day for me. Draining because I take each loss personally and my heart breaks. I walked through the memorial remembering ones I’ve known and those I attended their funerals. Unfortunately the list is longer each year.
Someone once said to me, some years back, ‘Cyd, they aren’t all yours and you can’t take it so personally.’ Well she was wrong! I love them all, even when I don’t know them and it reminds me of how precious life and family and loving each other is.
I’ve spoke with many Gold Star Family members today and they are so thankful for this event and what it teaches our community. That is the reason we do this.
That is the reason I promise to keep doing it until my last breath.
It is the very least we can do, for ALL that has been done for us.

Cyd

run_for_fallen_tampaThe memorial display will be up through Sunday at the Hillsborough County Veterans Memorial Park, 3602 Hwy 301, Tampa, FL 33619.

There are only days left for runners and even walkers to register for the 10K, 5K and 1 mile runs.

The 2013 Run for the Fallen scheduled Sunday, Sept. 8 with a candlelight vigil set the evening before.  Tampa Area Marine Parents Association, TAMPA. The Run for the Fallen is one of their major events.

Cyd asks if you can’t come to the free event and run yourself, please, at the very least, go to the page for the memorial, like and share to spread more information about this display.

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