Teens Spend Summer Vacation at Tampa’s Haley VA

Youth volunteer Mairyn Harris, 14, and Kathleen Fogarty, director of James A. Haley VA Medical Center.

Youth volunteer Mairyn Harris, 14, and Kathleen Fogarty, director of James A. Haley VA Medical Center.

When teachers ask this fall: “What did you do on your summer vacation?” Nearly four dozen Tampa teenagers will answer: “I spent it at the James A. Haley VA Hospita.”

For more than a decade, Haley has been operating a summer Youth Volunteer program that gives teenagers insight into health care careers while at the same time helping veterans.

Mairyn Harris will be a ninth grader at Wharton High School this fall. She is spending five days a week this summer at Haley. On Monday through Thursday she helps with clerical work in the administrator’s office. On Sunday she comes back and volunteers with her mother in the long-term unit.

“We work in in the nursing home part with veterans taking them to church, getting them to lunch, coffee, doughnuts that sort of thing,” Harris said.

She also helps with the pet therapy taking care of the therapy dog, Simon.

“Well that’s our future right?” said Kathleen Fogarty, director of James A. Haley VA Medical Center. “She gets exposure to the whole gamut of the acuteness of an illness all the way to the long term care of it. She’s working in our office, so she really sees everything that could possibly happen. She’s great.”

Forgarty sees a lot of herself in Harris.

“I don’t know if Mairyn knows this, but that’s how I started my career was a teen volunteer a hospital in Denver Colorado. And I took care of the CEO. I answered her phones while her secretary went to lunch,” Fogarty said.

Haley’s Youth Volunteer program accepts teens ages 14 to 18 and starts recruiting in April for up to 50 positions.

Camilla Thompson, chief of Voluntary Services, said the teens are asked to volunteer from 80-100 hours, must have a TB test and go through a full day of training. They are then assigned to one of more than 20 different services at Haley like nursing services or the recreational therapy department.

“They get an opportunity to provide like a buddy program where they read to veterans or they may get the newspaper for them or they may assist them with meal prep,” Thompson said. “They get an opportunity to interact with veterans by playing games.”

The volunteers also help take veterans on outings. Thompson said they do limit the teenagers’ exposure to veterans and service members with more severe injuries in the Spinal Cord Injury unit and Polytrauma Center.

“We really tread lightly with that and have open discussions and gain feedback from youth whether or not that’s an experience they’re comfortable with,” Thompson said.

The 47 Haley youth volunteers will finish their summer of service in August with a reception sponsored by veteran service organizations. The teens get a chance to share what they liked most about their summer vacation at Haley. You can listen to the story at WUSF News.

A Look at the Highest Paid VA Employees in Florida

James A. Haley VA Medical Center.

James A. Haley VA Medical Center.

Six of the region’s 10 highest-paid Veterans Affairs employees are physicians who work at the James A. Haley Veterans’ Hospital, according to The Tampa Tribune.

All six physicians earn more than $350,000 annually at the Tampa facility, one of the nation’s largest and busiest VA facilities. A total of 40 Haley employees and 11 at the C.W. Bill Young VA Medical Center are doctors earning at least $300,000, The Tribune reports.

Several of the highest-paid employees earned salaries and controversial performance awards, The Tribune reports. The House Veterans Committee pointed out that performance pay continued to be paid without a clear link to performance, according to The Tribune.

Veterans’ VA Issues Go Beyond Medical Delays

U.S. Rep. Dennis Ross (left) fields a question during his news conference from Army veteran Luis Canino Mas (standing on the right).

U.S. Rep. Dennis Ross (left) fields a question during his news conference from Army veteran Luis Canino Mas (standing on the right).

Recent months have shown that there is no shortage of veterans who have had problems with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

More than two dozen of them brought their issues to the Temple Terrace City Hall for a veterans’ intake event July 2, 2014 organized by Congressman Dennis Ross (R- Lakeland).

Ross said his office has received complaints about delays getting VA medical appointments but also they’re also hearing a lot about problems with VA benefit claims

“What we’ve seen is when the veterans administration would receive claims, if they denied them and in many cases they denied them, they would consider them closed,” Ross said during a news conference after the intake.

There’s supposed to be an appeals process for veterans denied benefits, but Ross said many veterans have experienced undue delays with their appeals.

U.S. Rep. Ross with veteran Luis Canino afterward.

U.S. Rep. Ross with veteran Luis Canino afterward.

“For those on the benefits side, due process is everything,” Ross said. “We have multitude of cases where they have recouped retroactively payments that were due for years past.”

His congressional staff is currently working on than 100 cases involving veterans.

Ross said he is open to outsourcing the claims process and offering private medical care as an option if it would speed up service to the veterans.

Other Tampa Bay members of congress have held recent “intake” days to give veterans direct access to VA representatives, congressional staff and state veterans advocates including U.S. Rep. David Jolly (R-Seminole), U.S. Rep. Gus Bilirakis (R-Tarpon Springs) and U.S. Rep. Kathy Castor (D-Tampa).

USO Opens Its First Center Inside Tampa’s VA Hospital

Tampa’s James A. Haley Veterans’ Hospital officially opened a USO Day Room July 1, 2014 located next to the Spinal Cord Injury Center where there are many long-term patients.

U.S. Rep. Kathy Castor (D-Tampa) plays air hockey with one of the veterans inside the new USO Day Room at James A. Haley VA Hospital.

U.S. Rep. Kathy Castor (D-Tampa) plays air hockey with one of the veterans inside the new USO Day Room at James A. Haley VA Hospital.

This is the first time a USO center has been built inside of a veterans’ hospital. Senior Vice President of the USO John Hanson said that although the 1,900-square foot space is not the largest USO center, its impact will be “profound.”

“I’ll be honest with you. This is an experiment for us,” Hanson said. “Our entire focus for 73 years, more than 73 years, has been on lifting the spirits of active duty troops and their families. This center is going to serve those needs. It’ll also serve the needs of veterans who come here and the active-duty troops recovering from injuries. It’s going to be their place.”

The day room includes a large screen television for games and movies, a “Kids Corner,” a pool table and an air hockey game.

The USO Day Room includes a play area for smaller children as well as a large, flat-screen television. The idea is to make it feel like home for active-duty troops and veterans with long-term stays in the VA.

The USO Day Room includes a play area for smaller children as well as a large, flat-screen television. The idea is to make it feel like home for active-duty troops and veterans with long-term stays in the VA.

Haley VA Hospital Director Kathleen Fogarty said that the features contribute to the therapy of military patients in the Spinal Cord Injury Center, and give them a “home-like situation.”

Several local Taco Bell restaurants raised $30,000 during their “Freedom Bells” fundraiser for the Armed Forces Families Foundation (AFFF) which contributed to the USO project. The AFFF Managing Director Nick Peters said the donation is a testament to military appreciation.

“When you think about it,” Peters said, “we raised twice as much money for the Armed Forces Families Foundation as we do for Boys & Girls Club and World Hunger, which are great charities, but it gives you a sense of the affinity for the military.”

The USO World Headquarters donated $25,000 to the project, and the Tampa Kiwanis donated $2,500 for the “Kids Corner.” Prior to the Day Room, patients’ time with family was spent in their their hospital rooms.

Sarasota National Cemetery Dedicates Amphitheater and Art

The $12 million Patriot Plaza and art installations were paid for in full by the Patterson Foundation.

The $12 million Patriot Plaza and art installations were paid for in full by the Patterson Foundation.

Nearly 3,000 people are expected to gather in Sarasota Saturday morning to remember and honor veterans for their sacrifice and service.

It’s not Veterans Day that’s five months off and Memorial Day was more than four weeks ago.

The Sarasota community is gathering to dedicate Patriot Plaza, the first of its kind, privately funded amphitheater and art installation at the public Sarasota National Cemetery.

Sitting on almost two acres of land just north of the columbarium, Patriot Plaza can seat up to 2,800 people shaded by a space-frame glass structure that soars 50 feet high. The design is such that there are no columns obstructing views of the rostrum or stage which can hold a 55-piece orchestra.

Patriot Plaza with its 80-foot stainless steel flag pole sits on 1.8 acres adjacent to the Sarasota National Cemetery columbarium.

Patriot Plaza with its 80-foot stainless steel flag pole sits on 1.8 acres adjacent to the Sarasota National Cemetery columbarium.

It cost an estimated $10 million to build and was paid for in full by the Patterson Foundation. The philanthropic group spent another $2 million on the art installations and established a $1 million endowment for maintenance and structural replacement.

Debra Jacobs, president and CEO of the Patterson Foundation, said there’s a back-story on why the foundation wanted to partner with the federally run veterans’ cemetery.

“We actually traced back the roots of the wealth that created the Patterson Foundation,” Jacobs said. “We traced back to the mid-1800s when Joseph Medill bought into the troubled Chicago Tribune for two reasons: one to make money and two to create Republican Party to get Lincoln elected.”

It was under President Abraham Lincoln that Congress authorized buying land for the first national cemetery in 1862.

But the connections don’t stop there. Two of Medill’s grandsons served in World War I and his great grandson, James J. Patterson, graduated from West Point. Patterson’s widow, Dorothy Clarke Patterson, created the foundation.

Fast forward to 2008 and the groundbreaking ceremony for the Sarasota National Cemetery.

“They anticipated 1,000 people going to the groundbreaking and 3,000 showed up in the middle of July, hot summer days, to turn a spade of dirt,” Jacobs said. “That speaks to the military service in the region with over 100,000 veterans living in this area.”

The seals from all five branches of service and Pablo Eduardo's "Guardian Eagle" sculpture greet visitors at the west entrance to Patriot Plaza.

The seals from all five branches of service and Pablo Eduardo’s “Guardian Eagle” sculpture greet visitors at the west entrance to Patriot Plaza.

Where there was no shade, Jacobs saw opportunity to honor those who have served the country and their families.

Jacobs worked with Steve Muro, the Under Secretary of Memorial Affairs with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs National Cemetery Administration, to create the private-public partnership that allowed the enhancement of the Sarasota National Cemetery.

That included seven public art installations.

“Public art sparks thinking, reflection. It helps you ponder what has happened, what could happen. So we thought let us bring art into Patriot Plaza and then it becomes a place of deep experience beyond any performance or exhibit,” Jacobs said.

As the son of a veteran, the Sarasota National Cemetery director John Rosentrater is especially excited about the photographic  art installation.

“I’m just hoping that the conversations that can get started by the artwork that takes place where children or grandchildren or spouses are asking their loved ones, ‘Do these pictures depict for you what happened?’” Rosentrater said.

The former Sarasota National Cemetery director, Sandra Beckley, retired after 39 years with the VA. She served as the consultant on the project.

President Lincoln's famous quote about veterans and a bronze depiction of an empty nest by artist Ann Hirsch adorn the east entrance to Patriot Plaza.

President Lincoln’s famous quote about veterans and a bronze depiction of an empty nest by artist Ann Hirsch adorn the east entrance to Patriot Plaza.

She read a quote from President Abraham Lincoln’s second inaugural address that is posted at the east entrance to Patriot Plaza.

“Let us strive on … to care for him who shall have borne the battle for his widow and his orphan,” Beckley said. “That is part of the whole VA as well as NCA (National Cemetery Administrtaion). It’s their motto and their mission.”

Beckley was part of the selection committee that chose four artists after a national search to help create the seven art installations define Patriot Plaza. Among the artworks are two spires and mosaics by Ellen Driscoll, bronze eagle sculptures at the east entrance by Ann Hirsch called “Home” and two “Guardian Eagles” at the west entrance by Pablo Eduardo.

Larry Kirkland has two installations “Testimonies” and “Witness to Mission” where photographs are mounted in marble columns or plinths.

The same marble used for head stones was used by artist Larry Kirkland in his art installation "Testimonies" and is based on themes like conflict, military life and work.

The same marble used for head stones was used by artist Larry Kirkland in his art installation “Testimonies” and is based on themes like conflict, military life and work.

“They cut a small frame out of the marble and inserted these pictures,” Beckley said. The “Witness to Mission” exhibit features 44 photographs Kirkland and Kenny Irby, founder of the Poynter Institute for Media Studies  photojournalism program, selected and paired for display along the northern perimeter sidewalk.

On the plaza above is Kirkland’s other display which features photos pressed between glass  and suspended in a whole cut from the marble columns. Each column is inscribed with a word such as “Service” or “Conflict” and with a passage from a veteran or family member.

“Larry Kirkland picked this marble because it’s the same marble used in the headstones that we see right adjacent to us,” Beckley said. “When he was here for the installation, he said there was no way to separate Patriot Plaza from Sarasota National Cemetery or Sarasota National Cemetery from Patriot Plaza. Now that they are together they are one.”

The Sarasota National Cemetery and Patriot Plaza are open from sun up to sun down seven days a week and you don’t need to be a veteran or have someone interned there to visit, experience the art and contemplate the sacrifice of the veterans now at rest there.

One of two glass mosaic spires designed by artist Ellen Driscoll from her watercolor "Night to Day, Here and Away."

One of two glass mosaic spires designed by artist Ellen Driscoll from her watercolor “Night to Day, Here and Away.”

 

Special Counsel Says VA Is Downplaying Deficiencies

Special Counsel Carolyn Lerner at the U.S. Office of Special Council.

Special Counsel Carolyn Lerner at the U.S. Office of Special Council.

In a six page letter to President Obama dated June 23, 2014, Carolyn Lerner, head of the U.S. Office of Special Counsel, detailed 10 cases where the VA admitted serious deficiencies in patient care yet denied it had any impact on the veterans’ health, public safety or patient rights.

 In one case, the VA’s OMI (Office of the Medical Inspector) said it could not find “a danger to public health and safety,” although its investigators confirmed that nearly 3,000 veterans at a VA facility in Fort Collins, Colorado, were unable to reschedule canceled appointments, including veterans whose “routine primary care needs were not addressed” as a result.

Another case brought forward by a VA psychiatrist showed that a patient with a 100 percent service related psychiatric condition was in the Brockton, Massachusetts mental health care facility for seven years before treatment recommendations were noted on his chart.

Another veteran with “significant” mental health issues waited more than eight years after being admitted before receiving a psychiatric evaluation.

The letter also details significant problems at the VA facility in Jackson, Mississippi and found the administration’s response “unreasonable.”

  • A shortage of providers caused the facility to frequently cancel appointments for
    veterans. After cancellations, providers did not conduct required follow-up, resulting in situations where “routine primary care needs were not addressed.”
  • The facility “blind scheduled” veterans whose appointments were canceled, meaning
    veterans were not consulted when rescheduling the appointment. If a veteran subsequently called to change the blind-scheduled appointment date, schedulers were instructed to record the appointment as canceled at the patient’s request.  This had the effect of deleting the initial “desired date” for the appointment, so records would no longer indicate that the initial appointment was actually canceled by the facility.
  • At the time of the OM! report, nearly 3,000 veterans were unable to reschedule canceled appointments, and one nnrse practitioner alone had a total of975 patients who were unable to reschedule appointments.
  • Staff were instructed to alter wait times to make the waiting periods look shorter.
  • Schedulers were placed on a “bad boy” list if their scheduled appointments were greater than 14 days from the recorded “desired dates” for veterans.

“… in the fantasy land inhabited by VA’s Office of the Medical Inspector, serious patient safety issues apparently have no impact on patient safety.  It’s impossible to solve problems by whitewashing them or denying they exist,” chairman of the House Committee on Veterans Affairs, Florida Congressman Jeff Miller (R-Pensacola), released in a statement on the OSC Letter to President Obama.

You can read the letter to President Obama and the in-depth analysis of the Jackson VA Medical Center.

 

 

Jolly to Take Veterans’ VA Stories to Washington

Navy veteran Robert Barrie talks with Cong. David Jolly about getting the USS NOA on the VA list for Agent Orange exposure.

Navy veteran Robert Barrie talks with Cong. David Jolly about getting the USS NOA on the VA list for Agent Orange exposure.

Florida Congressman David Jolly (R-Seminole) asked for and got an earful from local veterans this week. He invited them to his office in Seminole where they shared stories of their experiences within the VA health care system.

The veterans were offered immediate assistance from Jolly’s staff, VA representatives and volunteers from veteran service organizations.

And Jolly, who serves on the House Veteran’s Affairs Committee, promised to take the veterans’ stories back to Washington with the aim of improving the system. Yet, a survey of those who stopped by Jolly’s office showed that 68 percent rated their VA care from excellent to adequate.

More than 180 veterans came to Jolly's Seminole Office, and a majority rated their  VA care from adequate to excellent.

More than 180 veterans came to Jolly’s Seminole Office, and a majority rated their VA care from adequate to excellent.

But there were plenty of veterans who were not so pleased. Among them, two veterans looking for help – not for themselves – but for other their fellow veterans.

Navy veteran Robert Barrie wore his blue polo-shirt inscribed with Tin Can Sailor – USS NOA. He’s president of the Navy Destroyer USS NOA reunion group that has more than 300 members.

“We served in Vietnam in 1969,” Barrie told Jolly. “We were in a place called Qui Nhon Harbor. We are trying to get the ship qualified for Agent Orange.”

The congressman watched as Barrie opened a notebook filled with letters, photos and the ship’s deck log to prove his point. They are documents, Barrie said, will qualify his crew-mates for VA coverage of 15 diseases associated with Agent Orange exposure.

Barrie complained the VA has repeatedly misplaced the documents and have yet to qualify the USS NOA as a “brown water” ship that cruised along the Vietnam coast and up the rivers exposing crews to Agent Orange spraying.

Robert Barrie holds a notebook stuffed with documentation he said shows the USS NOA served in coastal regions of Vietnam and was exposed to Agent Orange.

Robert Barrie holds a notebook stuffed with documentation he said shows the USS NOA served in coastal regions of Vietnam and was exposed to Agent Orange.

“Have you ever used a congressional inquiry?” Jolly asked.

“No. We’ve been submitting these things into the VA,” Barrie responded.

“We’ll get the inquiry done in the next three to four weeks,” Jolly said.

He promised to write a letter about the USS NOA directly to Acting VA Secretary Sloan Gibson in the next two week and ask that he pay specific attention to the problem.

Also armed with documents, Vietnam veteran Al Kelly handed Jolly two well-worn pieces of paper – a discharge form and a citation for the Silver Star.

It was not Kelly but his brother-in-law recommended for a Silver Star while in the infantry in Vietnam. He provided ground fire during an attack, while severely wounded, so his entire company could move from an open rice paddy to the cover of the woods.

“Forty-five years of untreated PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder). He ended up in prison. He did 23 calendar years locked up,” Kelly said. “And when he got out, he applied for his assistance.”

Al Kelly asked Jolly to help get PTSD treatment for his brother-in-law, a Vietnam veteran.

Al Kelly asked Jolly to help get PTSD treatment for his brother-in-law, a Vietnam veteran.

“So, when he attempted to receive care after he got out what was the experience?” Jolly asked.

There was no response, no letter, no treatment, his brother-in-law never made it into the system.

Six months lapsed and Kelly’s brother-in-law had an incident with a girlfriend, was charged with a parole violation and put back in prison.

All Kelly wants is to make certain his brother-in-law gets treatment for his PTSD as soon as he is released from prison. And again, Jolly promised to follow up.

Kelly and Barrie are no different than tens of thousands of veterans across the country – veterans looking after their fellow veterans – determined to get them the best of care.

VA Begins Search for New Health Administrator

Deputy VA Secretary Sloan Gibson at the April opening of the new James A. Haley VA Polytrauma Center.

Sloan Gibson in April is now Acting VA Secretary.

The Acting Secretary of Veterans Affairs Sloan Gibson hung out the “Help Wanted” sign today to find a leader who will as he puts it “will be a change agent and deliver necessary reforms to provide our Veterans timely access to the world-class healthcare they’ve earned and deserve.”

Gibson said the new VA health administrator must have a sense of urgency and seriousness of the reform that is ahead.

A commission of health experts started today reviewing candidates for the next Under Secretary for Health for the Veterans Health Administration.

The commission includes:

  • Nancy Adams, RN, Major General Retired, American Academy of Nursing Fellow
  • Garry Augustine, Washington Headquarters Executive Director, Disabled American Veterans
  • Delos Cosgrove, M.D., President and CEO, Cleveland Clinic
  • Lt. General Patricia Horoho, Army Surgeon General and Commander, U.S Army Medical Command
  • Kenneth W. Kizer, M.D., M.P.H., Distinguished Professor and Director, Institute for Population Health Improvement, University of California Davis Health System
  • Jennifer Lee, M.D., Virginia Deputy Secretary of Health and Human Services
  • John E. Prescott, M.D., Chief Academic Officer, Association of American Medical Colleges
  • Jose D. Riojas, Chief of Staff, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
  • Bob Wallace, Executive Director, Veterans of Foreign Wars

 

The AP: VA Wait Times “Likely Shorter” Than Reported

VA-logo2The VA appointment database has yielded yet another surprise. An assistant deputy undersecretary told The Associated Press that patients getting quick care were not part of a statistical analysis that found excessive average waits for medical care at many facilities.

Data released by Veterans Affairs officials earlier this week appeared to confirm that new patients at the agency’s medical centers were routinely waiting 30, 50 or even more than 90 days to see a doctor. It turns out those statistics came with some big caveats.

Average wait times at many of the facilities are likely much shorter, Philip Matkovsky, an assistant deputy undersecretary at the Department of Veterans Affairs, told The Associated Press on Friday.

He said information about patients who received care very quickly was left out of the analysis for technical reasons.

“They are valid numbers,” he said of audit results issued Monday, but acknowledged that the exclusion of those receiving swift care and other factors led to longer average reported wait times for some facilities than actually experienced by veterans.

You can read the full Associated Press report that explains how the recent audit “snapshot” of VA appointments did not include some data that would bring down the average wait times reported initially.

Tampa VA Gives TBI Veterans the STAR Room Treatment

VA speech and language pathologist Kathryn Kieffer

Haley VA speech and language pathologist Kathryn Kieffer explains how the sensory therapies are used in the STAR room.

The Veterans Affairs scandal over delayed medical appointments and secret wait lists is still unfolding. And there’s been plenty of evidence that there are systemic problems at VA medical facilities throughout the U.S.

Yet, even the VA’s toughest critics note that most of the VA medical staff are hardworking, dedicated professionals.

“I believe that the majority of VA’s workforce, in particular, the doctors and nurses who provide our veterans with the care they need, endeavor to provide high-quality health care,” said Florida Congressman Jeff Miller, chairman of the House Committee on Veterans Affairs, Thursday at a hearing on VA bureaucratic barriers.

The medical staff at Tampa’s James A. Haley VA Polytrauma Center was acknowledged in April for their “cutting edge” care that helped revive Army Ranger Sergeant First Class Cory Remsburg from a severe brain injury.

A device to stimulate auditory and visual responses from TBI veterans.

All sorts of devices are used to stimulate brain-injured veterans like this flag-shaped button that when pressed makes the toy monkey clang its cymbals.

“He (Remsburg) arrived comatose with a severe, traumatic brain injury and long odds for recovery. But VA’s remarkable medical staff never gave up on the effort to jump start his brain,” said  Sloan Gibson in April as then deputy VA secretary at the opening of the new Haley Polytrauma Center.

Gibson is now acting VA secretary having taken the reigns after the resignation of Secretary Eric Shinseki.

“They tried a countless variety of sensory approaches to bring him to consciousness everything from aroma therapy to sitcoms on TV,” Gibson said. “Three months later, Cory became one of seven out of 10 patients with severe traumatic brain injury who’d come back to life through VA’s ground breaking emerging consciousness program.”

Those sensory therapies, used by the medical staff, have been brought together in the new, Haley Polytrauma Center. The STAR Room,  an acronym that for the Sensory Technology Awareness Room, is designed specifically for patients who are minimally conscious or emerging from severe brain injuries.

A wall projection of colors acts as a visual stimulant for veterans with TBI.

A kaleidoscope of colors is projected on the wall of the STAR room as visual stimulation for brain-injured veterans.

Speech language pathologist Kathryn Kieffer welcomed visitors into the STAR Room during the open house in April. It was dimly lit in hues of purple and pink.

Kieffer pushed a large, flag-shaped button that activated a toy monkey which clanged its cymbals and squeaked.

“We have over here an eye gaze device,” Kieffer then demonstrated how by just looking at a button written with the word “yes” – it generated the computer to say “yes.”

The STAR room has a multi-sensory environment with a myriad of technologies to stimulate all the patient’s senses from auditory to tactile. Kieffer pointed to one of the bubble tubes. They are clear cylinders filled with liquid. A light underneath changes colors as small bubbles percolate upward.

Deputy VA Secretary Sloan Gibson at the April opening of the new James A. Haley VA Polytrauma Center.

Deputy VA Secretary Sloan Gibson at the April opening of the new James A. Haley VA Polytrauma Center.

“The bubble tubes also have some vibratory properties to them so you can touch them and get some tactile feedback,” Kieffer said.

The STAR room was not available when Cory Remsburg was at Haley, but many of the therapies were and much of the medical staff. And those dedicated professionals now have the STAR room and the story of Cory Remsburg to motivate other severely wounded veterans to not give up.

You can hear the story on WUSF Public Radio.

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