A Look at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Now Closed

A Walter Reed Hospital postcard, ca. 1930s Courtesy of Moody Medical Library, UTMB

PLEASE NOTE THERE HAVE BEEN SOME UPDATES FROM THE ORIGINAL POST.

The last doctors, nurses and patients are now gone from Walter Reed Medical Center. The flag was lowered this weekend ahead of time due to Hurricane Irene.

National Public Radio is paying tribute to the 102-year old institution with a series of stories this week. You can read more about the history in a Timeline of Walter Reed Medical Center provided by NPR.

PART 1:

Where Generations of Wounded Soldiers Healed and Moved On

by Steven Inskeep

Maj. Reed’s Medical Innovations

Walking into Walter Reed’s old hospital building feels like going back in time, as the building changes from concrete and glass to brick and radiators.

Atop one fireplace in the hospital sits a bust of an Army doctor, Maj. Walter Reed. In 1898, during the Spanish-American War, Reed served as a troubleshooter for the surgeon general.

Part 2:

Walter Reed Center’s Closure May Be A Boon to D.C.

By Sabri Ben-Achour

 

Neighborhood Businesses Face Change

Just after the midday rush at Ledo’s Pizza on Georgia Avenue in Northwest D.C., Tim and Kelly Shuy sit down at a table.

“We get a lot of military families, people who are visiting, folks who are in the hospital. We get a lot of contractors,” Kelly says.

Their pizzeria is across the street from the sprawling Walter Reed campus. Lush with trees and a hilly landscape, the campus includes several iconic 100-year-old buildings with red tile roofs where patients, their families and staff were able to wander and just look out on the rest of the neighborhood from a distance.

There’s also a link with some historical background at  Walter Reed at U.S. National Library of Medicine website.

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