27 Things You Should Know About PTSD

Infantry veteran Timm Lovitt shared how he handles his PTSD in the VA About Face project.

Infantry veteran Timm Lovitt shared how he handles his PTSD in the VA About Face project.

A top concern of virtually every deployed military member is the misconception held by many civilians that all combat veterans have PTSD. It’s an incorrect assumption. But it’s a pervasive misconception among employers, educators and even some friends and family.

So, the Department of Veterans Affairs is attempting to bust that and other myths about post-traumatic stress disorder. An awareness campaign includes assigning today, June 27th, as PTSD Awareness Day.

For Veterans

One way to raise awareness is to listen to the veterans who are living with PTSD such as Timm Lovitt, part of the VA’s About Face project: Nobody knows Vets like other Vets. Here the Veterans offer personal advice about PTSD, based on what they’ve been through.

“One of my big triggers is driving,” Lovitt said. “I got angry and I rolled my window down. And just as I was about to you know start yelling things out, I realized, Timm, this is exactly what you don’t want to be doing right now.”

You can view Lovitt’s full video stories from other veterans below:

For Civilians

There are a lot of myths surrounding veterans and PTSD. Here are the top eight items from the VA’s list:  27 Things You Should Know about PTSD:

  1. Just because someone experiences a traumatic event does not mean they have PTSD.
  2. No matter how long it’s been since your trauma, treatment can help.
  3. To know whether you have PTSD, you should get an assessment from a clinician.
  4. Sexual assault is more likely to result in symptoms of PTSD than are other types of trauma, including combat.
  5. Social support is one of the greatest protective factors against developing PTSD after trauma.
  6. Research suggests that social support is an even more important resilience factor for women than men.
  7. Trouble sleeping is a core feature of PTSD, so it is important to address sleep problems in PTSD treatment.
  8. Getting help for PTSD early can prevent problems from expanding to other parts of your life.

You can learn the other 19 things you should know about post-traumatic stress HERE.

  • Just because someone experiences a traumatic event does not mean they have PTSD.
  • No matter how long it’s been since your trauma, treatment can help.
  • To know whether you have PTSD, you should get an assessment from a clinician.
  • Sexual assault is more likely to result in symptoms of PTSD than are other types of trauma, including combat.
  • Social support is one of the greatest protective factors against developing PTSD after trauma.
  • Research suggests that social support is an even more important resilience factor for women than men.
  • Trouble sleeping is a core feature of PTSD, so it is important to address sleep problems in PTSD treatment.
  • Getting help for PTSD early can prevent problems from expanding to other parts of your life.

– See more at: http://www.va.gov/health/NewsFeatures/2013/June/27-Things-You-Should-Know-about-PTSD.asp#sthash.XPirVoUP.dpuf

  • Just because someone experiences a traumatic event does not mean they have PTSD.
  • No matter how long it’s been since your trauma, treatment can help.
  • To know whether you have PTSD, you should get an assessment from a clinician.
  • Sexual assault is more likely to result in symptoms of PTSD than are other types of trauma, including combat.
  • Social support is one of the greatest protective factors against developing PTSD after trauma.
  • Research suggests that social support is an even more important resilience factor for women than men.
  • Trouble sleeping is a core feature of PTSD, so it is important to address sleep problems in PTSD treatment.
  • Getting help for PTSD early can prevent problems from expanding to other parts of your life.

– See more at: http://www.va.gov/health/NewsFeatures/2013/June/27-Things-You-Should-Know-about-PTSD.asp#sthash.XPirVoUP.dpuf

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2 Responses

  1. PTSD is not a exclusively health problems of veterans. They, endoubtly, have had serious chronically elevated stress, due to war theater, but most have not PTSD. Instead more civilians, more players and those who drink more have the same problem and live the same hard situations. For this citizens must understand veterans, not attach them stigma, have solidarity, that became a sort of mutually support. This health problem is a problem of alls and must be lived with serenity, asking help the one to the other, without distinction between veterans and civil society. claudio alpaca

  2. There is an App for iPhones and Android devices, “Bust PTSD” it works miracle for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. It’s evidence based and cost effective treatment for PTSD, developed in Canada. It helps to reduce PTSD symptoms for general population, it must also help veterans,highly recommended treatment approach.

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