Thank You U.S. Air Force Band for Your Flash Mob Concert

The cellist kicks off the concert by the U.S. Air Force Band Holiday Flash Mob at the National Air and Space Museum.

The cellist kicks off the concert by the U.S. Air Force Band Holiday Flash Mob at the National Air and Space Museum.

Okay, I’ll be the first to admit the “Bah! Humbug!” came out in me when I saw my first Christmas decorations at a retail store two weeks before Halloween. It’s kind of hard to “get in the spirit” when that “holidays” are commercially “in your face” for months at a time.

But, my joy of the season is restored thanks to the U.S. Air Force Band.

I wasn’t there for their Holiday Flash Mob concert at the National Air and Space Museum. Luckily, someone shot a video and put it on You Tube.

It’s worth the six minutes to watch. especially if you’re a little jaded by all the “holiday shopping” messages over the Thanksgiving Day weekend.

I can’t think of a better present to share than the joy of music. And I will admit, the fact that the Flash Mob started with a cello (my favorite instrument) certainly added to my new found happiness. Yet, what is truly mesmerizing are the photos of the children’s faces and even the adults as they watch the concert unfold. Give it a watch.

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Marine Who Won VA Coverage for Camp LeJeune Water Dies

Photo courtesy: The Few, The Proud, The Forgotten web site.

Photo courtesy: The Few, The Proud, The Forgotten web site.

A Marine who challenged and finally won his VA disability claim that his breast cancer was linked to Camp Lejeune contaminated water died just months after winning his claim according to the Sarasota Herald-Tribune.

Tom Gervasi, a veteran who won his protracted disability claim fight with the government over the rare cancer he contracted during his service, died Tuesday at home in Sarasota.

He was 77.

While serving in the Marines at Camp Lejeune, N.C., in 1956, Gervasi was exposed to contaminated water that caused breast cancer, which rarely affects men. For the last decade, he fought with the government over medical coverage for him and other veterans.

After repeated denials, he finally received a letter from the Department of Veterans Affairs in April confirming that the contaminated water had in fact caused his cancer.

Read the full Sarasota Herald-Tribune article here.

In March, the VA started reaching out to former Marines and families who lived at Lejeune during the period of contamination. Details on eligibility and a list of illnesses covered by the VA such as breast cancer, bladder cancer and female infertility are available here.

If you served at Camp Lejeune during the period of contamination, August 1953 through 1987, and have health problems, you may be eligible for VA benefits. Details are available here.

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