VA Fires Four Administrators, But Is It Just for Show?

U.S. Rep. Jeff Miller (FL-R) on the left, listens to new VA Secretary Bob McDonald, on the right, during their visit to Tampa's James A. Haley VA Polytrauma Center on Oct. 1, 2014.

U.S. Rep. Jeff Miller (FL-R) on the left, listens to new VA Secretary Bob McDonald, on the right, during their visit to Tampa’s James A. Haley VA Polytrauma Center on Oct. 1, 2014.

When Bob McDonald visited the Tampa Bay region last week, the new Department of Veterans Affairs Secretary promised to take action against VA administrators if the Inspector General determined they were involved in wrongdoing or coverups.

This week, the new VA administrator started keeping his promise with the firing of four high ranking administrators reports Stars and Stripes.

Among those being fired were a top purchasing official at the Veterans Health Administration, directors of VA hospitals in Pittsburgh and Dublin, Georgia, and a regional hospital director in central Alabama, the VA said.

“VA will actively and aggressively pursue disciplinary action against those who violate our values,” Deputy VA Secretary Sloan Gibson said Monday. “There should be no doubt that when we discover evidence of wrongdoing, we will hold employees accountable.”

But the Chairman of the House Committee on Veterans Affairs, U.S. Rep. Jeff Miller (FL-R), was quick to point out to The AP that one of the four VA executives had already said he would retire last month.

“Bragging about the proposed removal of someone who has already announced his retirement can only be described as disingenuous,” said Rep. Jeff Miller, R-Fla., chairman of the House Veterans Affairs Committee.

The House Committee on Veterans Affairs distributed a news release Oct. 7, 2014 where Chairman Miller further admonishes the VA for not acting swiftly in the dismissal of VA executives especially at troubled medical centers where medical care was delayed and employees covered up the long wait lists.

VA appears to be giving failing executives an opportunity to quit, retire or find new jobs without consequence – something we have already seen happen in recent weeks. Right now, it’s incumbent on all of VA’s external watchdogs — Congress, the press and the American public — to maintain pressure on the department until those who created VA’s problems receive the accountability they are due.

You can read more about the House Committee on Veterans Affairs efforts to hold VA administrators accountable on their congressional website that also offers veterans a place for feedback.

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