West Point General Now Commands Saint Leo

Dr. William Lennox Jr., a former superintendent at the United States Military Academy at West Point, is the new CEO and president of Saint Leo University in San Antonio, FL.

Dr. William Lennox Jr., a former superintendent at the United States Military Academy at West Point, is the new CEO and president of Saint Leo University in San Antonio, FL.

Within the past week, Saint Leo University in northeastern Pasco County welcomed more than new college students to campus. The 126-year-old Benedictine bastion of learning has a new president after 18 years.

Retired U.S. Army Lt. General Dr. William Lennox Jr. stepped up July 1, 2015 to become the ninth Saint Leo president.

Lennox has a distinguished resume. A 35 year military career, a PhD in literature from Princeton, he served as West Point Superintendent from 2001-2006, and as a senior vice president at a Fortune 500 aerospace company for more than six years.

Now, he’s excited about being immersed back into college life and plans to walk the Saint Leo campus daily.

“I found at West Point that the students provide an energy for you and I’ve always managed, led by walking around, getting out and talking to folks,” Lennox said. “At West Point, I tried to get out of the office by 4 o’clock at the latest and go to practices or whatever was going on at the time. You learn so much more about your college or university when you do that.”

 Dr. William Lennox - the new president - helps carry a student's belongings to the dorm on "Move-In Day" Thursday at Saint Leo University. Renee Gerstein Saint Leo University


Dr. William Lennox – the new president – helps carry a student’s belongings to the dorm on “Move-In Day” Thursday at Saint Leo University.
Renee Gerstein Saint Leo University

It’s not that he doesn’t already know Saint Leo. Lennox served as a board member for more than seven years before he was asked to take over as president when Dr. Arthur Kirk retired.

“As a board member, I was at the 1,000 foot level. I’ve got to get down to the 100 foot level that the CEO-President operates at,” Lennox said.

One of his challenges is uniting the more than 16,000 Saint Leo students spread out between the Pasco County campus, online and distance learners at more than 40 education centers in the U.S.

“Saint Leo was on the cutting edge with online education and with the community centers they have around the country,” Lennox said. “If you haven’t been there, you can’t appreciate the enthusiasm. A lot of those students are a little bit older, some of them have jobs, some of them have struggled to get their education and Saint Leo means an awful lot to them.”

Many of those students are active-duty military or veterans that Lennox said share the same values as students attending the Catholic university.

 Faculty, students and staff are joined by Dr. William Lennox, Saint Leo University’s ninth president, for Move-In Day, August 20, at the Pasco County campus. Renee Gerstein Saint Leo University


Faculty, students and staff are joined by Dr. William Lennox, Saint Leo University’s ninth president, for Move-In Day, August 20, at the Pasco County campus.
Renee Gerstein Saint Leo University

“I guess I’m just attracted to universities or colleges that have strong missions and a great value system West Point and Saint Leo,” Lennox said. “Some of the values are excellence – community – respect – self-improvement – integrity – those are the kinds of values that the Benedictines have held for a long time and I think apply to the current situation in the world right now whether you’re an academic – or you’re a businessman or you’re, whatever you’re doing. I think they apply directly and we need more of them in this world right now.”

Lennox sees his job as preparing “value-driven” leaders and embraces the challenge just like he did at West Point when the 9-11 terrorist attacks hit just three months after his appointment.

“Shortly after that, we had the largest number of students in the country that applied and we couldn’t accept everybody certainly. But it was pretty amazing and the motivation of those young folks was extraordinary. And they’ve done some amazing things afterwards,” Lennox said.

Lennox, the educator, expects the Saint Leo students to be similarly motivated to change the world.

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Mud Run to Benefit Saint Leo Student Veterans

Sometimes you’ve got to get down and dirty to raise money for your charity. And that’s exactly what Saint Leo University is doing.

One several mud obstacles at the Mud Endeavor course in Brooksville, FL.

One several mud obstacles at the Mud Endeavor course in Brooksville, FL.

To raise money for the veteran student emergency fund (now known as Military Education Excellence), the Saint Leo Veteran Student Services office is partnering with Mud Endeavor to sponsor the Mud Endeavor V Saturday, Oct. 4, at 29251 Wildlife Lane, Brooksville, FL.

The event is planned on the site of an old dirt mine and promises a 100-foot water slide, plenty of mud obstacles, challenging hill climbs and a spectator viewing area where you can see 75 percent of the course.

The dirtier and tougher, the better for military veteran Christopher Burke, incoming president of the Saint Leo Student Veterans Association.

“Sometimes, we need to get the blood pumping,” Burke said. “So things like the mud run, I believe that is going to be a huge thing. A lot of veterans – a lot of veteran organizations are tied to those events.”

Anyone who pre-registers for the Mud Endeavor V – using the promotional code: STLEOVETS will get a discount to $45 and their registration will benefit the Saint Leo Military Education Excellence fund.

The competitive runners start at 9 a.m. and participants continue in waves through 11 a.m. There’s a $5 charge for spectators.

 

Saint Leo Offers Veterans A Free Transition Course

Tedd "Gunny"Weiser has an impressive display of Marine Corps memorabilia on his office wall.

Tedd “Gunny”Weiser has an impressive display of Marine Corps memorabilia on his office wall.

It’s difficult to define today’s military veteran. But there is one thing they have in common – they don’t like being painted with the same broad brush.

“Just because I’m a veteran, particularly me because I’m a Marine, a combat Marine, don’t think you know my political affiliation, my beliefs, my values,” said Tedd “Gunny” Weiser, short for Gunnery Sergeant. “There is a label and we want to shed that, we want people to know that we are our own person.”

After 20 years in the Marine Corps, Weiser has become a touchstone for the veterans at Saint Leo University where he’s now interim director of Veteran Student Services. He knows what it’s like to have difficulty moving into the civilian world, to hit rock-bottom with post-traumatic stress symptoms “starting to rear their ugly head.”

“It came to a point one day at a traffic stop. I actually put my car in park, got out of the car, ran up two or three car lengths ahead of me to tell the driver who cut me off six miles back what I thought of him and my wife said, ‘That’s enough,’” Weiser said.

The floormat outside Tedd Weiser's door replicates the yellow footprints outside the Marine Corps recruit depots.

The floormat outside Tedd Weiser’s door replicates the yellow footprints outside the Marine Corps recruit depots.

He got help from the VA for his PTS and decided to pursue his passion and his faith which led Weiser to Saint Leo University where he’s working on two masters’ degrees in Religion and Instructional Design.
But Weiser said he found his true calling running the Veteran Student Services office and the student veterans appear to be responding.

When Weiser started as an assistant in December, he said they averaged about one to two veteran visits a week. Now, just weeks into the fall semester and more than 60 have come through the office.
To help with the veterans’ adjust to campus life, a team at St. Leo University including Weiser, developed an online, Veterans Transition Course.

They partnered with Corporate Gray, publishers of The Military to Civilian Transition Guide which is used by the Department of Defense. Saint. Leo created an online version.

“We wanted to make it as easy as possible for our student veterans and their families knowing that their time is limited and their resources are limited,” Weiser said.

The Saint Leo University Veteran Student Services office hands out dogtags celebrating their student veterans.

The Saint Leo University Veteran Student Services office hands out dogtags celebrating their student veterans.

The course is broken into eight modules and is self-paced. So, it can take as little as eight weeks or as much as eight months to complete depending on a veteran’s needs. And the course is geared to more than academics. It also offers guidance on networking, interviewing, resume building and even negotiating salary and benefits.

Weiser encourages the spouses and adult children of the student veteran to take the online course too.

“Because if it helps them, then it helps that veteran because it’s one less thing that veteran has to worry about,” Weiser said.

About one-third of Saint Leo’s 15,000-to-16,000 students are veterans or active duty military and a majority are not on the Pasco County campus. Saint Leo University has a College Online as well as 40 locations, many on military installations, throughout the U.S.

“When others in the 70s were protesting military, Saint Leo went onto its first campus in North Florida and started teaching at a military installation,” Weiser said. “We just celebrated our 40th Anniversary last year.”
That anniversary generated donations that created another program Saint Leo’s Student Veteran Emergency Fund.

 Interim director of Veteran Student Services, Tedd "Gunny" Weiser, stands in Dempsey Plaza home to the sculpture, "For Those Who Serve," that honors the men and women of the armed forces.


Interim director of Veteran Student Services, Tedd “Gunny” Weiser, stands in Dempsey Plaza home to the sculpture, “For Those Who Serve,” that honors the men and women of the armed forces.

Since January, Weiser says they’ve given more than 30 gifts ranging from $200 to $500 to help with a financial crisis. The student veteran fills out an application, answers some questions about their financial problems.

The circumstances are reviewed on a case-by-case basis. Weiser said he tries to give the student veteran a response within 12 hours.

“We’ve given money for, just last week, cancer medications, day care, car repair, unemployment, food, utility bills,” Weiser said.

That isn’t the only gift St. Leo University Veteran Services is distributing.

Their online transition course was initially just for their students. But earlier this month, the course was opened up to all transitioning military and veterans for free whether they’re headed to Saint Leo University, another college or into the job market. You can learn more about the online Veterans Transition Course here.

 

A Green Beret Busting Myths About PTSD

Saint Leo University veteran student Brian Anderson is willing to talk about his experience with post-traumatic stress to bust myths held by the general public.

Saint Leo University veteran student Brian Anderson is willing to talk about his experience with post-traumatic stress to bust myths held by the general public.

The U.S. military is downsizing. The war in Iraq is over, and combat troops are due out of Afghanistan by the end of next year. So more than 1 million service members are expected to enter the civilian workforce in the coming years.

That’s why two veterans are on a mission to help employers and the community in general separate fact from fiction when it comes to post-traumatic stress disorder.

First, not every veteran has PTSD. It affects only an estimated 20 to 25 percent of combat veterans, according to Saint Leo University associate professor Dr. Jim Whitworth, a 21-year Air Force veteran with a Ph.D. in social work.

There’s a lot to understand about post-traumatic stress and the best teachers are those with the diagnosis. However, most veterans are not comfortable talking about their traumatic experiences.

That’s where the bravery of Brian Anderson shines through. He is willing to share what can be painful details so clinicians, the public and employers have a better understanding of returning veterans.

Anderson joined the military because of September 11th. His first hitch in the Army was as a photo-print journalist with the 82nd Airborne Division. Anderson then became a Green Beret.

“I killed my first man on Dec. 31st 2008. And, you know, at that point it was more of a high-five type experience.  I was psyched. I was really pumped about it,” Anderson said. “The second deployment, I went in, our very first fire-fight was eight hours long. And we killed 39 Taliban that day and we had a couple of our guys wounded. Continue reading

PTSD Myths vs. Reality Workshops for Employers, Public

Air Force veteran and Saint Leo University faculty member Dr. Jim Whitworth, Ph.D.

Air Force veteran and Saint Leo University faculty member Dr. Jim Whitworth, Ph.D.

Some military veterans report that employers are hesitant to hire them due to worries about post-traumatic stress.

So St. Leo University, 30 miles north of Tampa, is offering two free workshops to human resource professionals, mental health experts and the general public who want to learn more about “Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in the Workplace.”

Dr. Jim Whitworth, Ph.D. and member of the Saint Leo University social work faculty, will lead two workshops on the myths versus reality of veterans diagnosed with PTSD.

Air Force veteran and social work faculty member, Dr. Jim Whitworth, will lead both half-day workshops on the “Myths versus Reality” of veterans diagnosed with PTSD.

“The truth is is that it’s just a normal person in many cases dealing with that abnormal incident that with time and good support they can get better,” Whitworth said. “And of course, they bring all these great strengths to the table as well that we know about military members that they have a high commitment to their employers in many cases and lots of attention to detail.”

The workshop on Wednesday is scheduled 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and focuses on employers and businesses looking to hire veterans. The Thursday workshop is geared more for mental health professionals and also is set from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Both workshops are free but require registration. You can find details at the Saint Leo website.

Confessions from a Woman Marine – A Book Reading

EYES RIGHT Tracy CroweAuthor of the book,  Eyes Right: Confessions from a Woman Marine, is the featured guest at a free reading and book signing planned Friday, April 5, at Saint Leo University, 33701 State Road 52, Saint Leo, FL.

Tracy Crow served as a Marine officer and a military journalist and is now a creative writing teacher at Eckerd College. Eyes Right is a book about her military experiences in the 1980s.

Crow is scheduled to speak at 3:30 p.m. in the Student Community Center Greenfelder-Denlinger Boardroom C. She will be introduced by Saint Leo University creative writing teacher Gianna Russo.

The event can be followed live online if you can’t make the presentation. You may view the presentation live at 3:30 p.m. ET. Contact Nikki Collins, assistant director of alumni relations, at (352) 588-8837 or nichole.collins@saintleo.edu for more information.

Central Florida Veterans Offered Free Help with VA Benefits

Saint Leo University's tribute to 40 years of serving the military. Photo credit St. Leo

Saint Leo University’s tribute to 40 years of serving the military. Photo credit St. Leo

An eight member team from the University of Detroit Mercy Law School that travels the nation offering free help to veterans is due to pull into the Tampa Bay region this week.

The offer of free legal help is called Project Salute and scheduled to arrive at Saint Leo University, 33701 State Road 52, in Pasco County this Friday, Feb. 22, 2013.

Clinic hours are set from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. but will be extended if needed.

Low-income veterans who need help filing disability and pension benefits are welcome. Veterans should bring with them all necessary paperwork such as their Discharge from Active Duty (DD-214) form. any recent VA rating decisions and other pertinent documents.

The clinic will be held in the St. Leo Student Activities Building, room 117. Legal help will also be available aboard the Project Salute bus parked near the Tapia Lakeside Patio at the Student Community Center.

The university has a full calendar of events planned in observation of its 40th anniversary of serving the military.

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